Barrington Brewery

Barrinton-Brewery-sign

Out and about Grumpy and Mrs. Grumpy in the company daughter and son-in-law stopped at the Barrington Brewery  in Great Barrington, MA for diner. Had never been there at dinner time and was pleasantly surprised at the selection of menu items.

I warned our vegetarian son-in-law going in that the pickings might be slim, but again was surprised at the numerous choices available.

The Barrington Brewery, as the name implies, runs their own line of brews and boasts the only craft brewed beer by solar power. Grumpy doesn’t know what that means except that those pieces of equipment that run on electricity are powered by solar array in the side yard. Makes Grumpy feel good that the brews he consumes here required no energy other than that supplied by Ole Sol.

Their list runs to eighteen unique brews, although not all are available at one time. Some are seasonal. Selection runs from Black Bear Stout on the dark and strong side through Barrington Blond a light pale ale but with plenty of body.   A new personal favorite is their New Englander. A pale ale brewed from hops from the Connecticut river valley and barley from Maines potato fields.  Matches well with most menu items, not overpowering for dishes such as fish and able to hold its own with buffalo wings. They do offer sampler board of five of their brews. Have yet to try it, Grumpy has decided tastes and has to drive after the experience.

Soup or salad comes with all full dinner entrées. Most had the salad but Grumpy, being a contrary individual, ordered soup, a spicy vegetable. Chock full of vegetables with hardly enough room for the tasty broth, this could have been a satisfying meal on its own. Looks of envy from his dining companions suggested they had made the wrong choice.

Grumpy’s dinner selection was herbed baked cod. Hesitated a bit over the selection as it is not usually a wise choice in a pub-like atmosphere. But being cautiously adventurous, he selected it. The light flakey cod was served over a bed of spinach. The whole  dish was infused with a white wine sauce that included tomatoes, onions and garlic. The herb package was a subtle blend but rosemary predominated with an undertone of basil. Grumpy expected to manage only a portion of the mound of spinach, but the infused flavor was such, there was only a clean plate at the end of the meal.

There was no need to worry about vegetarian options. There are fifteen listings between appetizers and main menu, that’s not counting the seafood selections.

Two of us had the herbed cod, one fish and chips and the fourth the BBQ brisket sandwich. I got to try the leftovers from the brisket—lean meat, tender, in a BBQ sauce that made its presence known but did not overpower.

The fish and chips, breaded, sautéed and baked came as two massive filets along with the chips.  Looked good, but one filet came home. Our cats enjoyed the leftovers.

RATING:

Ambiance = 8

This is a pub atmosphere and loud.  Our group was seated near the bar with a playoff game in progress with all of the cheering and jeering going on. There is a dining room but it is open to the bar so the pub atmosphere seeps in there as well.  One does not go to Barrington Brewery for a quiet dining experience.  Taking that into consideration, it deserves an “8” It’s a great pub that serves wonderful food.

Food = 9

The quality the food was high on all of the dishes our group ordered. An element of creativity pervades most offerings without being overbearing and off the charts on the wild side. Good solid cuisine served with a unique twist.

Service = 8

Despite the crowded conditions, our waitress was attentive to our needs. Only a few minor waits and our table was in another room. 

Value = 9

Barrington Brewery keeps their prices reasonable, only one dish above $20.00. Cooking this good at these prices deserves praise and an exemplary ranking for value.  

Advertisements

Mosaic Cafe – Northampton, MA

Right in the heart of academia there is a great spot for middle eastern food, The Mosaic Café. It’s a dine-in- take- out place obviously catering to students and faculty with a penchant for middle eastern cuisine.  The floor space is small, but they pack in an unusual number of tables owing to the single design of square four-seater tables that can be configured to fit any sized party. Our group was six so we reconfigured the arrangements to our needs.

There is outdoor dining under a retractable awning but the wrought iron circular tables were best for two or three people and not convenient for our group. And it was raining and blowing so we decided on inside seating.

It was warm and humid inside owing to the fact that the kitchen is open to the dining area over. You order your meal from the counterman and it is brought to you by the chef and assistants.  Come to think of it, in Grumpy’s limited time in the middle east this was the usual arrangement of eating establishments. It was rare to have a full service sit down meal and it was also hot and humid.  The warmth should be a welcome respite from the cold New England winter days.

The place was remarkably clean for a student hang out although the tables were tacky with moisture and the lack of a strong detergent scrub. Kind of lent to the illusion of the being overseas.

The food was excellent and portions large. Grumpy and Mrs. Grumpy ordered the Crepe web IIshawarma crepe, loaded with vegetables, mushrooms and the braised meat,  assumed to be lamb.  Full of spices, fourteen in all if it is made traditionally, the combination was marvelous. The gigantic crepe came in a shallow bowl swimming in the piquant sauce. Grumpy would go back for this dish alone, although there were plenty of options on the menu to be tried.

 

 

 

Two of our party ordered the falafel platter.  The dish came with the falafel balls, falafel-plate-web IIhomemade hummus, stuffed grape leaves, a salad, and pita bread for the hummus—a platterful. Grumpy tried the falafel, the hummus and the grape leaves. The falafel was moist, the stuffed grape leaves tasty and the hummus smooth with no grit. Makes two dishes Grumpy would order the next time we are in.

One of the more adventurous of our group had the swordfish steak.  Came piled with cooked vegetables, pepper, onions, Kalamata olives and maybe a mushroom or two.sword fish web II You couldn’t even see the fish in the bottom of the bowl.  But it was there alright, a substantial piece of fish that looked succulent in the sauce. Nothing was left over so it must have been good.

 Service = 8

This is a self-service establishment you order at the counter and get your own utensils and drinks. The do serve your meal at the table fortunately, because the size of the dishes would make the crowded café nearly impossible to navigate without a few accidents.  But this also allows the chef and his assistants to bask in adoration of the presented meal.  So middle eastern.

Ambiance = 7

There is much to recommend this place but Grumpy, being grumpy, felt the heat and noise was a detriment to the overall experience. The closeness of the tables when at capacity leaves one feeling jammed in. Fine for students, but Grumpy needs his space for a “fine dining” experience.  Bet the heat would be welcome in January.

Food Quality = 9

All raves around our table. There are some creative twists to the menu like the shawarma in a crepe.

Value = 10

Pricing is reasonable and quality high. That makes for a good value.

So it ain’t fine dining, but excellent food, and plenty of it at fair prices makes this a go to location when in Northampton.

Diner Much? – Diner Lux

Diner much? These bastions of the original “fast food” once served up meals from truckers to millionaires. That is until the modern day fast food industry took over. Every town had at least one of these eateries varying from the typical Pullman car design to the glitz and glamor of large dining palaces.  With the advance of the modern fast food industry, the diners withdrew and many out of business as the American dining landscape began to alter. But there had been a resurgence of late. The diners are back as an homage to nostalgia.  One prime example is Diner Lux in New Milford, CT. Not your humble Pullman style but a grand and glitzy version with plenty of stainless steel and neon on the façade it sits on the southbound side of route 7 just south of town. Can’t miss it. 

Not fine dining, by any definition, the Lux boasts of good solid comfort food, and pages and pages of it. Grumpy finally settled on the Rueben because of its presumptive title the Carnegie. Now Grumpy has had the Carnegie Rueben and while this was not it, the Lux version was as good of an approximation as he has had.  Loaded with lean corned beef, topped with melted swiss, Russian dressing, tasty, sauerkraut, and bookended by substantial slices of marbled rye bread the lux Rueben is was a sandwich worth making note of. Served with a large side of cold slaw and fries you have a satisfying meal.

They do an unusual prep with their fries. First of all, they are fried in fresh oil, no fish fried previously. And second, they sprinkle the fries when hot with a parmesan of pecorino cheese, a most flavorful twist.

You won’t find a list of craft beer here. In fact, Sam Adams is as crafty as it gets.  But they do have Pabst Blue Ribbon on tap.  Who has PBR on tap there days?  Hadn’t had one for years.  One sip and I knew why.  Watery, weak in flavor, the taste of the tap lines overpowered the flavor of grains, malt and hops.  Well, Grumpy took one for nostalgia, but never again in his lifetime.

Our waitress was knowledgeable, friendly and like to joke around.  She led me to the selection of the Rueben. I would rate the service a 9 or 10, but come time to follow up with desert options and the check, she was nowhere to be found. Finally, a manager issued checks to us and two other tables.  We were not asked about dessert.  I am sure there is a story there, “The Case of the Missing Waitress”, but frustration trumped interest. We had a way to go before our trip was ended.

Ambiance = 9: In a glitzy, nostalgic way

Service = 6: The missing waitress was a problem.  The delay at the end of the meal was inexcusable. Manager should have stepped in sooner. There were several upset tables.

Quality = 8: Good old American dishes done well.

Value = 9: Pricing reasonable, quality good.

If you are in the New Milford area and seek a good solid meal with a sprinkling of nostalgia, you can’t go wrong with the Diner Lux, unless your waitress goes missing.

The Station – Naugatuck

With apologies, I took a week off. I suffered a stroke  three weeks ago that effected my language center.  I am on the mend, but am not up to my usual speed, so if this piece seems off in tone for me, that is the reason. It is a shame that I have to rehab on The Station piece, it’s a great place.  I hope I have done it justice. 

There a new kid in town, Naugatuck that is. The recently opened Station restaurant is a fine addition to the dining scene in town. Recommended by a friend from the area, we took advantage to have a family reunion of sorts, Naugatuck being the half way point between us.

The décor hits like MetroNorth express. Not your typical grungy railroad stop any more. Fresh coats of varnish on the woodwork, the new art deco ceiling and of course new dining room equipment that replace the waiting room benches all work toward the transformation.  Despite all the improvements, preservation of the station has been faithful. But therein lies another surprise, the sound level rivals the old station where boarding and arrival announcements echoed through the hollow chamber.  It is, in busy times, difficult to hold a normal conversation without shouting.

The new owners have thought of creature comforts. A glass enclosed portico with benches where waiting to be seated is in a pleasing bit of climate controlled outdoors. The benches have shoe lasts hanging on their underside, a strange sight.  An homage to the Uniroyal shoe sole industry, perhaps?

They offer outdoor dining on a spacious patio.  The area is only partially shaded and although they have large cantilevered umbrellas, I imagine it would be quite under the blazing summer sun.  The trip across the parking lot convinced Grumpy that the inside was the place for us. But a mild spring or fall day it could be a pleasant experience.  

Speaking of parking, there is plenty particularly on weekends. The large, freshly paved lot is shared with MetroNorth commuters on weekdays. I don’t expect a space problem and rumor has it that the temporary boarding platform with be moved further down the line.

On to the dining experience. Hot day and a cold beer seemed the proper choice.  The list included a number of craft selections. Grumpy selected a Naughty Nurse a City Steam brew.  An English style ale, not over-hopped, and a compliment to the meal. 

A dish called Tortellini Porto Fino, cheese tortellini held together with prosciutto, mushroom, and peas in a cream sauce caught Grumpy’s eye.  Can you say “carbonara”?  Tasty, with plenty of ham, and “shrooms” it was a bit heavy for lunch but a good test of their dinner menu—a two thumbs up. Oh dear, I probably should not have that expression as the current occupant of the White House has coopted the action of raised thumbs for political purposes.  Well, you get my drift.

One of our party had scrod with the usual discussion on the origin of the term “scrod”. My definition, and the one that makes the most sense to me, in that the term was coined to represent the freshest catch of the day. The fickle nature of fishing the Atlantic could mean that the last caught fish and the freshest could be halibut, cod, pollock, flounder or haddock. Visiting the dock when the boats moored could bring any of these specied to the restaurants of Boston.  Menus could not be created with the agility of today and the cost of printing was high.  So, “scrod” was born as the universal term that covered all “sins”.

The Stations version had to be halibut or haddock, thick and flakey as it was. Testimony was delicious and none was left.

Others had a barbeque chicken wrap. The sandwich was filled with cutlets of chicken breast basted in a smoky barbeque sauce. Lettuce and tomato rounded out the wrap.  Messy but full of flavor, I got a chance to taste the leftovers.

An early complaint was that the service was slow.  This was right after opening and Grumpy saw no evidence of that.  In fact, the inverse was the case.  The young man who waited on us was attentive to our every need and without delays. There seemed to be an abundance of servers.  Maybe The Station learned their lesson and chose to be responsive to their clientele.

Did I mention the decorations?  Almost missed my turn to order, staring at the ceiling. The art work is stunning and defies logic. Power lifts and staging aside, the geometric patterns are astounding. Well worth the trip to view, but I would recommend a lunch or dinner to go along with the view.

Ratings:

Food Quality – 8

Pub style food with a touch of creativity. Menu large but not overbearing, plenty of options without being confusing.

 Service – 9

Whatever prompted the complaint was no longer present when we visited.

Value – 8

Pricing reasonable and quality high equals value.

Ambiance – 8

The management has done a fine job at restoring and preserving the building. So often the new use dictates the design of the building and few details of the original remain.  Not so, The Station.  There is little doubt that you’re in a terminal in the harking back to hey-day of railroading. We even go to see a MetroNorth train zip by bound for Waterbury.

On Editing….

Shifting gears, a bit this week, I thought I would address the writerly types not so much because I have some revelation to offer to those of you who labor with the pen, but because I am getting quite a few inquiries as to what is happening with my next book.

Now that A Tin Full of Gold is on the market, there is an expectation for the next publication.  Well I do have things in the hopper. What I find interesting is the apparent belief that because one has inscribed “the end” on a manuscript, that one is automatically ready to “go to press.” Doesn’t work that way, at least not for me and I suspect not for many of us struggling to get meaningful narrative down on paper.

Steven Pressfield author of the War of Art commented on the difficulties of writing— “It’s not the writing part that’s hard. What’s hard is sitting down to write.”

I suppose that is true for some of us.  I do not suffer that particular affliction. What I find harder is the editing. That, for me, is where the real work begins.  First drafts are and should be messy in my view. My advice has always been just write the damn thing, get it done, drive through to the end. What you have, out of the chute is fraught with errors and most likely is a verbal pile of crap. So be it. If your story concept and premise are sound you have in your hands a malleable lump of story clay that can be bent, shaped, added to, or shaved down into a finished work that is enjoyable to readers and satisfying to you. 

Because they are messy, I always recommend against offering up first efforts to a critique group, just to “see how it flies”. That’s kind of like throwing a raw steak to the junk yard dog. No rational or caring critic or ravenous dog is going to pass up that opportunity and the results are always disastrous.  A first draft is too far from your best work. Parsing out unedited work is a bit unfair on either side.

Editing is a must and if you follow the advice above and drive to the end without the nit-picking, in-process changes, editing is an ABSOLUTE must. But review and rewrite will make the final piece where the initial writing assembles the ideas and puts them into words.

Malcom Gladwell author of The Tipping Point says, “The first eight drafts are terrible.” True that—maybe more. I have heard a paraphrase of this statement that I like even better. “By the time you reach the eighth draft, the writing starts to really get good.”

Can’t give you an attribute to that last.  Wish I could, because does it ever ring true. Guess what?  My next novel, Black & White is on the eighth draft and I think it is finally coming together.

“Eight drafts of a hundred-thousand-word novel are you crazy?”  Nope, that is what it takes and that is why it seems forever from the time you announce the completion of the work to the time you are ready for the agent, the publisher or the press.

“What does one do for eight drafts anyway?”  That is a topic for another blog or series of blogs. But to throw out some of the things I have dealt with in Black & White, (I’m not done yet) here are a few of them.

Once I got to see the whole novel structure, I realized I started in the wrong place so I moved forward in the story to begin on a conflict (in media res is the film term – in the middle of the action). That helped get the reader into the piece, but eliminated an image I planned to use as a bookend for beginning and end of the story.  Had to rewrite the ending.  It also forced a change in the working title of the book, and the potential cover design.

By the time I got to “the end”, I realized my protagonist had a flat character arc, he didn’t grow much.  I had written him strong at the beginning (when he really wasn’t) and he remained that way to the end—a flat-lined story teller who didn’t change. Sometimes you will have a protagonist/narrator who does not change. (Think Ian Fleming’s James Bond) My character is not James Bond and I needed to show that.  I had to let him grow so his insecurities needed to come out early, a whole rewrite by itself to grow him throughout the story.

There were logistic things that required straightening out or clarification, there always are. Because this book is loosely autobiographical, I found myself minimizing setting description.  I was there after all and saw the places in vivid detail, but that needed, in many cases, to be translated into words on the page for the benefit of the reader.

Does each change require an entire rewrite?  No, but you do have to be sure the brick you are adding to the wall fills the space surrounding it in a contiguous fashion, no lumps, no bumps.

“Can’t you do all this stuff in one or two passes?”  Maybe some can. There are four pass editing programs for sale. For those of us less mentally nimble, editing for one or two items is all we can handle without the risk of skipping over things that should be changed or rewritten.

I think the editing part is the toughest, but the least bit uninteresting.  On the contrary, watching the unformed lump of the first draft shape up into a final product is pretty exciting.  Can be frustrating too.  When I decided to cut the front end, and start Black & White further on in the story, it was painful to trash three chapters of what I considered to be perfectly good prose.  It had to be done for the novel as a whole and I think the work is better for it.

Yes, sitting down to write, forcing the time to do so is tough, but editing is tougher.  Just summoning up the courage and willingness to “kill your babies” can be emotionally wracking.

Not sure where that “killing your babies” term comes from but it floats frequently around writing groups and says a lot about the editing process.  I’m going to toss that one over to Annie Kelleher, friend and author.  I heard it from her first.

On Editing

Shifting gears, a bit this week, I thought I would address the writerly types not so much because I have some revelation to offer to those of you who labor with the pen, but because I am getting quite a few inquiries as to what is happening with my next book.

Now that A Tin Full of Gold is on the market, there is an expectation for the next publication.  Well I do have things in the hopper. What I find interesting is the apparent belief that because one has inscribed “the end” on a manuscript, that one is automatically ready to “go to press.” Doesn’t work that way, at least not for me and I suspect not for many of us struggling to get meaningful narrative down on paper.

Steven Pressfield author of the War of Art commented on the difficulties of writing— “It’s not the writing part that’s hard. What’s hard is sitting down to write.”

I suppose that is true for some of us.  I do not suffer that particular affliction. What I find harder is the editing. That, for me, is where the real work begins.  First drafts are and should be messy in my view. My advice has always been just write the damn thing, get it done, drive through to the end. What you have, out of the chute is fraught with errors and most likely is a verbal pile of crap. So be it. If your story concept and premise are sound you have in your hands a malleable lump of story clay that can be bent, shaped, added to, or shaved down into a finished work that is enjoyable to readers and satisfying to you. 

Because they are messy, I always recommend against offering up first efforts to a critique group, just to “see how it flies”. That’s kind of like throwing a raw steak to the junk yard dog. No rational or caring critic or ravenous dog is going to pass up that opportunity and the results are always disastrous.  A first draft is too far from your best work. Parsing out unedited work is a bit unfair on either side.

Editing is a must and if you follow the advice above and drive to the end without the nit-picking, in-process changes, editing is an ABSOLUTE must. But review and rewrite will make the final piece where the initial writing assembles the ideas and puts them into words.

Malcom Gladwell author of The Tipping Point says, “The first eight drafts are terrible.” True that—maybe more. I have heard a paraphrase of this statement that I like even better. “By the time you reach the eighth draft, the writing starts to really get good.”

Can’t give you an attribute to that last.  Wish I could, because does it ever ring true. Guess what?  My next novel, Black & White is on the eighth draft and I think it is finally coming together.

“Eight drafts of a hundred-thousand-word novel are you crazy?”  Nope, that is what it takes and that is why it seems forever from the time you announce the completion of the work to the time you are ready for the agent, the publisher or the press.

“What does one do for eight drafts anyway?”  That is a topic for another blog or series of blogs. But to throw out some of the things I have dealt with in Black & White, (I’m not done yet) here are a few of them.

Once I got to see the whole novel structure, I realized I started in the wrong place so I moved forward in the story to begin on a conflict (in media res is the film term – in the middle of the action). That helped get the reader into the piece, but eliminated an image I planned to use as a bookend for beginning and end of the story.  Had to rewrite the ending.  It also forced a change in the working title of the book, and the potential cover design.

By the time I got to “the end”, I realized my protagonist had a flat character arc, he didn’t grow much.  I had written him strong at the beginning (when he really wasn’t) and he remained that way to the end—a flat-lined story teller who didn’t change. Sometimes you will have a protagonist/narrator who does not change. (Think Ian Fleming’s James Bond) My character is not James Bond and I needed to show that.  I had to let him grow so his insecurities needed to come out early, a whole rewrite by itself to grow him throughout the story.

There were logistic things that required straightening out or clarification, there always are. Because this book is loosely autobiographical, I found myself minimizing setting description.  I was there after all and saw the places in vivid detail, but that needed, in many cases, to be translated into words on the page for the benefit of the reader.

Does each change require an entire rewrite?  No, but you do have to be sure the brick you are adding to the wall fills the space surrounding it in a contiguous fashion, no lumps, no bumps.

“Can’t you do all this stuff in one or two passes?”  Maybe some can. There are four pass editing programs for sale. For those of us less mentally nimble, editing for one or two items is all we can handle without the risk of skipping over things that should be changed or rewritten.

I think the editing part is the toughest, but the least bit uninteresting.  On the contrary, watching the unformed lump of the first draft shape up into a final product is pretty exciting.  Can be frustrating too.  When I decided to cut the front end, and start Black & White further on in the story, it was painful to trash three chapters of what I considered to be perfectly good prose.  It had to be done for the novel as a whole and I think the work is better for it.

Yes, sitting down to write, forcing the time to do so is tough, but editing is tougher.  Just summoning up the courage and willingness to “kill your babies” can be emotionally wracking.

Not sure where that “killing your babies” term comes from but it floats frequently around writing groups and says a lot about the editing process.  I’m going to toss that one over to Annie Kelleher, friend and author.  I heard it from her first.

The Driftwood Diner – Darien, CT

For those of you in the southeast corner of Connecticut or those traveling through, there is a new watering hole in Darien, The Driftwood Diner. Located on the post road (Rt 1) on the east side of town the establishment takes the place of the Darien Diner. New management, new crew and new broom the place is swept clean. Redecorated and restyled, the facility is clean and neat with green walls and pristine white woodwork. All the furnishings are new and color coordinated with the paint scheme. In short, not your typical truck stop diner.

The difference does not stop at décor.  The menu is not your typical sixteen-page tome, but a judicious two-page listing.   They do offer a variety of standard breakfast items which I understand are available all day, but even there, the creativity of the kitchen staff asserts itself.  When was the last time you ordered avocado toast at your local truck stop?

Newly graduated from culinary school the chefs are spreading their “foody” wings and it shows in the lunch and dinner options.  The menu is short with only a few items for full entree’s. Better to do a few things well than a lot of things so-so, a sound philosophy for those just starting out.  They do offer specials in both the appetizers and main meals so it pays to listen to your server.

Grumpy went with Grilled Chicken Paillard, grilled chicken breast over a tricolored salad with parmesan- lemon vinaigrette. The chicken cutlets were done just right, not your usual dry, overcooked, tough platelets. The salad beneath was fresh and crisp, the whole dish brought together in a tangy whole.  So good, Grumpy even ate a good portion of the tiny sliced plum tomatoes in the mix.  For those who know me, prepping an entrée well enough to get me to not separate out the tomatoes is a remarkable accomplishment.

Mrs. Grumpy went for one of the specials, Quinoa crochets an appetizer turned main dish. She raved about them, and is still talking about the meal several weeks later.  They come in two versions, chicken or tuna. She went with the chicken, warm tuna not one of her favorite things. Needless to say, this dish will be a repeat when we make it back.

The desert menu is limited as well, but they expand daily.  A freshly prepared strawberry cheesecake was offered when we were there.  Real cheesecake, folks, none of that prepackaged pudding fluff. Real fruit, chunks of strawberries and a lot of them in a light sauce on the top, NOT the usual lumps of red mush in a tacky red goop resembling semidried Elmer’s glue.  I’m sure my cardiologist’s own heart did a double bump, but this stuff was some of the best I have ever had and well worth the risk of a semi clogged artery.  We each ordered a piece and in retrospect probably should have shared a single slice. We were overstuffed at the end, but nothing was left on either plate.

The Driftwood is a place to try if you are in the area, or even as a destination location.  It is that good.  I wish them luck in the new venture, they have the potential for a neat little fine dining establishment.  But therein lies a rub. The menu and entrees seem to run counter to the name Driftwood Diner.  Indeed, the patrons present when we were there seemed to fall into two groups, those there for the creativity and skill of the new chefs and those who wandered in attracted by the “diner” designation on the sign out front. One couple arrived after we had been served our entrees and was gone before we finished.  They were too far removed to see what the problem might have been, but it was obvious the most they ordered were appetizers. I sensed disappointment as they headed out the door.  Another party, a mother and young kids hesitated at the door and probably would have left if not for the available breakfast menu.

This dichotomy in dining styles is in need of resolution. Diner implies a certain style and variety of foods to the passerby. What is offered is not what I would call diner fare.  I hope they work out their identity issue so they can focus on attracting the appropriate, repeat clientele whichever that might be. Grumpy of course would prefer they land on the side of fine dining.   I am not sure the owner agrees, but does the area need another truck stop?

Rating:

Ambiance = 8 – Super clean and neat.

Food = 9 – Creative Chefs, Interesting and different dishes.

Service = 8 – Our waitress was fun and funny, but the only one for the entire restaurant. If they were at capacity I am not sure the experience would have been so pleasant.

Value = 10 – Diner prices for fine dining options? How can you go wrong?